INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL ROTTERDAM


Kala Azar (JaniKala Azar (Janis Rafa, 2020), SNG Film / Heretic, Netherlands / Greece, DCP, colour, sound, 85 minutes, Penelope (Penelope Tsilika)s Rafa, 2020), SNG Film / Heretic, Netherlands / Greece, DCP, 85 Minutes, Penelope (Penelope Tsilika)

KALA AZAR

Intra species oscillations govern Janis Rafa’s haunting first feature, winner of Rotterdam’s KNF Award

Proxima (Alice Winocour, 2019), Picturehouse Cinemas, France / Germany, DCP, colour, sound, 107 Minutes, Sarah Loreau (Eva Green)

PROXIMA

Mother and daughter say goodbye in Alice Winocour’s latest feature, an earthbound drama that evokes otherworldly grief

Meanwhile on Earth / Samtidigt på jorden (Carl Olsson, 2020), De Andra Film AB, Denmark / Sweden / Estonia, DCP, colour, sound, 72 Minutes

MEANWHILE ON EARTH

A purgatorial vision of the Swedish funeral industry examines existentialism and death, and does so vivaciously

Isadora's Children / Les Enfants d’Isadora (Damien Manivel, 2019), MLD Films, France / South Korea, DCP, colour, sound, 84 Minutes

ISADORA’S CHILDREN

Gestures predate personal grief in this meditative feature debut by dancer-director Damien Manivel

X&Y (Anna X&Y (Anna Odell, 2019), Sweden, DCP, colour, sound, 121 minutes, Mikael Persbrandt, Anna OdellOdell, 2019), Sweden, 121 minutes, Mikael Persbrandt, Anna Odell

X&Y

Swedish artist Anna Odell ups the game in her exploration of primal male-female relationships and the act of creation

Thirty / Dreissig (Simona Kostova, 2019), Germany, colour, sound, 114 minutes

THIRTY

Simona Kostava depicts Berlin Syndrome in a fascinating group protagonist tale

Vox Lux (Brady Corbet, 2018), Curzon Artificial Eye, USA, 35 mm / DCP, colour, sound, 114 minutes, Celeste (Natalie Portman)

VOX LUX

A luminous, merciless satire that plays on themes of trauma, self-deprecation, and the therapeutic role of art

Sons of Denmark / Danmarks sønner (Ulaa Salim, 2018), New Europe Film Sales, Denmark, colour, sound, 119 minutes

SONS OF DENMARK

Timely and ambitious dystopian tale falls short of genuine insight